Better Know a 2012 NBA Draft Pick: Chace Stanback

Mar 15, 2012; Albuquerque, NM, USA; UNLV Rebels guard Chance Stanback (22) drives against Colorado Buffaloes forward Andre Roberson (21) during the first half in the second round of the 2012 NCAA men's basketball tournament at the Pit. Mandatory Credit: Nelson Chenault-US PRESSWIRE

Editor's Note: The 2012 NBA Draft is just around the corner, and that means it's time to start looking at this year's prospects. We've enlisted the help of a couple of our community's top draftnicks to break down as many prospects as possible from this year's class, whether they're high-lottery picks, potential first-round sliders or sleepers that could make an impact on a team from the second round. Today: potential second round sleeper pick Chace Stanback, by pantslessyoda1.

PREVIOUSLY: Bradley Beal, Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Thomas Robinson, Harrison Barnes, Andre Drummond, Anthony Davis, Jared Sullinger, Terrence Jones, Perry Jones III

Team: UNLV

Expected draft position: Undrafted

College career recap: Chace Stanback began his college career at UCLA, then transferred to UNLV after his freshman year. His senior year saw him play a key role as a spot-up shooter for a surprisingly successful Runnin' Rebels team that went 26-9.

Basic Statistics Per 40 Pace Adjusted, via Draft Express

Year

Team

GP

Min

Pts

FGA

FG%

2PtA

2P%

3PtA

3P%

FTA

FT%

Off

TOT

Asts

Stls

Blks

2007/08

UCLA

25

5.8

13.2

13.5

40.4

7.5

46.2

6.0

33.3

0.6

50.0

0.9

5.2

1.7

2.6

0.6

2009/10

UNLV

34

26.4

16.1

14.1

43.6

9.2

50.2

4.9

30.9

2.9

80.3

2.6

8.7

2.2

2.4

1.2

2010/11

UNLV

33

29.3

17.6

13.9

47.8

8.6

55.0

5.3

36.2

2.9

80.3

2.5

8.0

2.0

1.5

0.9

2011/12

UNLV

34

27.9

16.9

12.9

45.5

5.9

45.6

7.0

45.5

2.4

82.0

1.5

6.0

1.7

1.3

0.5

Best attributes: Chace Stanback only does one thing very well, but he did it as well as any NCAA small forward last year - make jump shots off of the catch. What he lacked in volume (about 17 points per pace adjusted 40 minutes), he made up for in accuracy, as Stanback shot almost 46% from behind the arc and 82% from the line. Although he didn't show much in terms of being able to create anything for himself other than the occasional mid-range jumper, Stanback's perimeter shot could prove extremely valuable in the modern drive and kick NBA. Although he'd been more mediocre than great as a shooter before this past season, Stanback was among the top wings in the NCAA when you look at free throw percentage, three point percentage, and three point attempts, ranking second among NCAA small forwards in three pointers made per pace adjusted 40 minutes.

Also, despite lacking even above-average athleticism and possessing short arms, Stanback demonstrated solid enough lateral quickness that he should be able to stay in front of the majority of NBA small forwards. He is also very good at playing within himself, rarely trying to do too much and doing a solid job on the boards.

Biggest weakness: UNLV doesn't play the toughest schedule in the NCAA, Stanback is 22, and he still wasn't able to athletically dominate his competition. In short, he's not a good athlete and will most likely never be anything more than an average defender, although he gained a reputation as a solid one in college. He also has short arms, with a 6'6 wingspan, which is very short for a player who is 6'8 in shoes.

Why he'd fit in D.C.: He's a dead-eye shooter who plays within himself. Washington is built around an athletic drive and kick point guard and a core of young, athletic big men, but the team is almost completely devoid of accurate outside shooters. Stanback will never be a star, but his jump shot and adequate size could open up the interior for the Wizards. In terms of NBA comparisons, he's cut from the same cloth as a lot of the role players the Spurs have had success with, as well as players like James Jones and Boobie Gibson who have made a living off of hitting three pointers off of the dribble penetration of more athletically gifted teammates. Stanback has the size of a typical small forward, so he would be able to give the Wizards more production - even if it is just high efficiency, low volume scoring - from a position where, according to 82games.com, the Wizards were outscored by 4.2 points per game and surrendered a PER advantage of 5.

Why he might not: Stanback's not a great player, and definitely not a very well rounded one. While the talent is there for NCAA ball, there hasn't been much draft buzz around him - I couldn't even find out if he had hired an agent and he's not on many draft boards - so there could be players in the draft who can do the same things but with more upside. Role players are valuable, but there's a reason that so many are available on ultra-cheap contracts.

Verdict: Use a late second round pick on him, or at the very least invite him to summer camp. Despite an incredible sounding name, Chace Stanback hasn't generated much draft buzz and for good reason - he's not going to be a star. At the same time, a 6'8 guy who can hit 40% of his three pointers and plays within himself is a valuable commodity, especially for a young team that is almost utterly devoid of even above-average jump shooters and got a sub-10 PER from last year's starting small forward. There's no need to break the bank to acquire him, but Stanback could be extremely useful for the Wizards.

Look at the top teams in the NBA in the post-handchecking era - the Lakers are the only one that didn't surround its core of superstars with deadeye three point shooters, and they had Kobe Bryant and two dominant seven footers. Players who can shoot pretty well are out there, but players who shoot extremely well are hard to come by, at least for any team other than the Phoenix Suns circa 2010. Washington hasn't had a pure three point specialist since Mike Miller, and even he was too willing to get away from his strengths and venture inside the arc.

Chace Stanback could open up the interior for slashers, give John Wall a second option to pass to on pick and rolls, and possibly even run some pick and pop plays when other teams go small. Is that worth trading Trevor Booker for or taking in the lottery? No, absolutely not. But it's a great return on investment if all he costs the Wizards is a few hundred thousand dollars, a second round draft pick, or an unguaranteed contract.

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